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Miami Transplant Institute

1801 NW 9th Avenue

Miami, FL 33136

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Holtz Children’s Hospital

1611 N.W. 12th Avenue

Miami, FL 33136

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Our Adult and Pediatric Liver Transplant Program

Staying in the forefront of transplant medicine with new treatment options for patients of all ages.

A Recognized Leader in Liver Transplants

Miami Transplant Institute has been doing liver transplants for almost 50 years with more than 4,000 livers since 1988. We perform more than 125 liver transplants a year, one of the highest volumes in the world. Because our team can transplant new livers in patients who have been turned down by other centers because of their age or medical conditions, physicians at other transplant centers send their most complex cases to us.

A Recognized Leader in Liver Transplants

Miami Transplant Institute has been doing liver transplants for almost 50 years with more than 4,000 livers since 1988. We perform more than 125 liver transplants a year, one of the highest volumes in the world. Because our team can transplant new livers in patients who have been turned down by other centers because of their age or medical conditions, physicians at other transplant centers send their most complex cases to us.

4,000+

liver transplants since 1988 decades of surgical leadership

150+

liver transplants a year

19 to 25

pediatric liver transplants —giving children new hope

Liver Transplant Programs

If you or your child needs a liver transplant, Miami Transplant Institute’s multidisciplinary team will provide the best possible care. Our knowledge, experience, and leading-edge procedures deliver patient outcomes that exceed national averages.

Pediatric Liver Transplant Program

Miami Transplant Institute offers a child-focused pediatric liver transplant program. Our young patients also appreciate our specially designed pediatric intensive care unit with well-trained and experienced physicians caring for them after surgery.

Living Liver Donor Transplant Program

We offer a Living Liver Donor transplant program, giving parents, family members, and other donors an opportunity to provide a lobe of their liver to a transplant recipient. This alternative, when available, can reduce the waiting time for a donor organ, and improve the long-term outcome. In most donors and recipients, the liver grows significantly in four to six weeks and is capable of providing normal liver function.

For patients of all ages, our dedicated liver transplant team delivers compassionate, personalized care that offers new hope for a brighter tomorrow.

Adult Liver Transplant Program

Miami Transplant Institutes multidisciplinary liver transplant specialists evaluate every patient considering a liver transplant on an individual basis and will determine the best course of treatment for you.

Liver Transplantation Frequently Asked Questions

What is a liver transplant?

A liver transplant, also called a hepatic transplant, is a surgery performed to replace a diseased or injured liver with a whole or portion of a healthy liver from a donor. Since the liver is the only organ in the body able to regenerate, a transplanted portion of a liver can grow to its full capacity within a few weeks. This means that the transplanted liver can come from a living or deceased donor.

When is a liver transplant needed?

A liver transplant is recommended when a person’s liver no longer functions properly enough to keep them alive. Liver failure can happen suddenly as a result of viral hepatitis, drug-induced injury, or infection. It can also result from a long-term problem (chronic liver failure) that progresses over time. Conditions that can cause chronic liver failure include:

  • Chronic hepatitis with cirrhosis
  • Primary biliary cholangitis
  • Sclerosing cholangitis
  • Biliary atresia
  • Alcohol overuse
  • Liver cancers such as hepatocellular carcinoma
  • Wilson’s disease
  • Hemochromatosis
  • Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

What are signs of liver failure?

The liver can take a lot of damage, but when most of it is damaged, it will start to fail. Signs of liver failure may include:

  • Yellow skin and eyes (jaundice)
  • Forgetfulness, confusion, or coma
  • Feeling very tired
  • Muscle loss
  • Itching
  • Poor blood clotting
  • Swelling in the ankles or abdomen
  • Bleeding from the esophagus, stomach or rectum

What is a pediatric liver transplant?

A pediatric liver transplant is a surgery performed to remove a child’s diseased or injured liver and replace it with a healthy donor liver. The new liver may come from a deceased donor or part of a liver may come from a healthy living person, typically a family member. Since the liver is the only organ in the body that regenerates, the new liver will grow to normal size in a few weeks.

When is a pediatric liver transplant needed?

A pediatric liver transplant is recommended when a child’s liver is not functioning well and will not survive without a new liver. The most common reason for liver transplants in children is biliary atresia. This is a rare disease of the liver and bile ducts that occurs in newborns. Other conditions may include:

  • Liver cancer and other liver tumors
  • Acute liver failure
  • Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency
  • Viral hepatitis
  • Hemochromatosis
  • Wilson’s disease and other genetic diseases
  • Alagille syndrome and other conditions present at birth

What are signs of liver failure in a child?

In the early stages, symptoms of liver failure can look like other common childhood illnesses, such as the flu. Early symptoms may include:

  • Fatigue
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Loss of appetite

As liver failure gets worse, symptoms may include:

  • Yellow skin and eyes (jaundice)
  • Forgetfulness, confusion, or coma
  • Itching all over the body
  • Swollen abdomen
  • Dark urine
  • Bleeding from the esophagus, stomach or rectum

Bringing New Research to Our Patients

Our surgical team uses novel techniques that increase the number of available livers for our patients awaiting a transplant. For instance, we can perform successful transplants involving donors or recipients with hepatitis C (HCV) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We are also part of a multicenter study that involves preserving the donor liver at normal temperature using a blood perfusion machine, rather than cold preservation of the liver. Other studies involve the use of different immunosuppressants to improve transplant outcomes.

See The Lives We’ve Changed